If you want to quit smoking, we could help.
Project Quit is a research team at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) who are dedicated to improving treatment for smokers that want to quit the habit.

What is Project Quit?

Many people want to quit smoking but think it's too hard. The nicotine in cigarettes is a very powerful and addictive drug. For most people, quitting isn't easy. Current statistics show that it can take a person 30 attempts before becoming successful in quitting and 1 in 20 smokers attempting to quit are successful without some form of help. The Project Quit team at MUSC is investigating ways on how to advance medical science in helping smokers quit.

After learning of the health consequences, most people who smoke want to quit, but a majority fail when they try to quit without help. They could have symptoms like irritability, depressed mood and trouble sleeping. Medication and/or counseling may be very helpful for smokers who want to quit.

There is no cost to you for participation, and if you qualify, you will be paid to participate. If you have questions about Project Quit’s research opportunities and how we could help you or a family member or friend, please call (843) 792-4097.

How it works

Regardless of your level of interest in quitting, participation in smoking research is important as it can help Project Quit learn more about tobacco use disorder. By understanding the addiction better, there could be greater gains in improving interventions to help those who want to quit. We have a comprehensive research team that focus on tobacco use disorder providing treatment and non-treatment research.

Interested smokers can contact the study team to learn about the active studies that are currently enrolling. Study personnel will ask some basic questions to see what study might be the best fit based on a person’s level of interest in quitting, age, and other factors. Safety is the team’s number one priority. If study participation is not the best option, staff will provide some other resources in the community for a smoker to access.

All services are at no cost, and we provide compensation for participation. Participants must provide informed consent. Contacting the Project Quit team does not obligate participation. Smokers under 18 must provide parental consent.

In The News



Project Quit Helps Smokers Kick The Habit

The Project Quit team is currently conducting a half–dozen research studies aimed at both…

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Smoking cessation strategies targeting stress reduction may be more successful in women

Female smokers experienced more stress and craving…

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MUSC study uses pet health as motivation to help smokers quit

The Charleston Animal Society is partnering with M.U.S.C,…

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MUSC’s Project Quit Seeking Tobacco Use Research Candidates

There are approximately 50 million people in America…

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Pets & Smoking: The Deadly Secret Lurking in Your Home

New article/feature with Charleston Animal Society…

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Quit Smoking! Do it for your dog!

New article/featured in Lowcountry Dog Magazine on page 10…

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Active Studies

All studies are funded through NIH/NIDA (**with additional supports through the Hollings Cancer Center and MUSC Dept of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science’s Chairman’s Research Fund). We currently have ten active studies. You can scroll through them below.

Protocol Title:

A prospective trial of varenicline and incentives for tobacco cessation in adults

Study short name:

CAT

PI:

Dr. Erin McClure

Recruitment Summary:

The purpose of this study is to better understand tobacco outcomes using a well-known stop smoking medication, varenicline (Chantix), and financial incentives with tobacco users. We are also interested in how cannabis/marijuana and tobacco interact during a tobacco quit attempt. All participants will receive tobacco cessation treatment (varenicline) for 12 weeks. This study will recruit adult tobacco users (ages 18-40) who are motivated to quit smoking cigarettes.

Second site location in Pickens, SC. FB link:

Protocol Title:

Feasibility and efficacy of a remote behavioral intervention for electronic cigarette use among youth

Study short name:

Youth Vaping Pilot

PI:

Dr. Erin McClure

Recruitment Summary:

This study is recruiting youth between the ages of 12 and 21 who use electronic cigarettes (e-cigs, vaping) and are interested in quitting. The purpose of this research study is to explore if youth vapers can quit using a smartphone application that delivers incentives. This study is completely remote (no in-person visits) with phone call visits and the use of a mobile app.

Protocol Title:

Clinical Outcomes of a Nationwide, Naturalistic E-Cig Trial

Study short name:

CONNECT Study

PI:

Dr. Matthew Carpenter

Recruitment Summary:

The purpose of this study is to measure changes in smoking behavior during and following sampling of an e-cigarette product. We are testing the effects of one specific e-cigarette (NJoy) on smoking behavior. Neither the tobacco industry nor any e-cigarette manufacturer provides support of any kind to this study. There is no requirement to quit smoking in this study. This study involves 7 phone calls and 4 study visits over 6 months of participation.

Protocol Title:

Targeting Foundational Memory Processes in Nicotine Addiction: A Translational Clinical Neuroscience Study of a Retrieval-Extinction

Study short name:

Behavioral Memory Modulation in Nicotine Addiction (BMM Study)

PI:

Dr. Michael Saladin

Recruitment Summary:

This study examines the use of smoking cues (pictures, videos and objects) to change a person’s interest in smoking. This treatment study does NOT involve the use of study medication. Participants will complete 12 clinic visits over the course of 6 months. Participants must be between 22-65 in order to participate.

What is a Clinical Trial?

A clinical trial is a research study that helps answer specific health questions. In a clinical trial, human participants help research scientists find treatments that work in people. These participants, or human volunteers, find new ways to improve health.

Project Quit team studies are clinical trials sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) a part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and specifically funded through the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)to investigate methods to assist and improve people’s efforts to quit cigarette smoking.

Learn more about clinical studies at clinicaltrials.gov.